September 2014

Regular Columns

From the Editor
By Kelli Harrigan

Be Inspired
by Gary Blair

Widgets
by Michael Goumas

Featured Articles

NAEO Annual Conference – Keynote to Be Jake Poore!
by Laurie Blow

Upcoming Webinars

NAEO 2014 IS Summer Series Recap
by Theran J. Mossholder, Lina Masri and Gerald Brosseau III

Mid-Year Financial Report (January 1-June 30, 2014)
by Gordon Mott

Amtelco Annex

New Infinity Telephone Agent Version Number Display
by David Drenk

Internet Paging with SNPP and WCTP Contact Methods
by David Drenk

Kelli Harrigan

From the Editor

By Kelli Harrigan

Kids are back to school, autumn weather has started to move in and I was just informed that I only have 100 days to do my Christmas shopping! I don’t know about you, but I am not quite ready for that season yet!

My thoughts this month have been about Leadership. At a business group I recently attended, we had a discussion about whether you have to be in a position of authority to be a leader, or do each of us have the opportunity to lead, regardless of the titles we hold? I see leadership in my front-line staff when they take time to help someone who is struggling or when a senior agent mentors (whether they would call it that or not) a new team member. I see it among our industry associates who willingly share tips, best practices, and “how tos” with people who are essentially their competitors. Leadership, it seems to me, is less about title and more about attitude and action.

I recently spoke to one of my mentors and asked if it is possible for an introvert like me to be a good leader — or does leadership demand a more extroverted personality? She pointed me in the direction of this great TED Talk on introverts which made me really take more notice of the quiet people we all have on our teams — people who go with the flow, speak up when they need to, frequently fly under the radar but who are also full of lots of creative ideas and insights if you stop to ask them!

Watching this made me realize that when I am looking for leadership potential in my team members, I need to look beyond the more gregarious types and also include those who may be quieter or stick to the background, but have equal potential to be a future leader!

Another great TED Talk on the topic of leadership and how we can make our environments feel safe and thus be good leaders is by Simon Sinek, included below. Enjoy!

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Something to Be Inspired About

Submitted by Gary Blair

The leadership instinct you are born with is the backbone. You develop the funny bone and the wishbone that go with it.
~ Elaine Agather

A good leader is a person who takes a little more than his share of the blame and a little less than his share of the credit.
~ John C. Maxwell

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Widgets

Action Groups

by Michael Goumas, ProComm

I have had a few questions about Action Groups and Action Table. Action Groups and Action Tables are created in the Shared area of a script and also in the Shared area of a screen. There are pros for using the Script Shared area and there are pros for using the Screen Shared area. If you create it in the Script Shared area, it is available to all portions of the script, no matter what screen you are in. If you create the Action in the Screen Shared area, it is only available for that screen— but because it is in the screen, you can use the Select Prompt and also Set Screen Mode elements that are available during a screen. You could have the same Screen Shared Action Group or Table name in multiple screens, as the script only sees what is available to that screen and the script.

We will start with Action Groups. You can think of an Action Group as a piece of re-useable scripting. It saves on the script load times having these and also, as I like to put it, you change it in one place in the script and it changes everywhere. It also makes it easy to move them as “modules.” As an example, if I want to add the ability for my script to read the local weather I have an Action Group that I can copy from another script in to the new script and I am good to go.

Here is the Action Group:

And then to access it in my script:

Another example of a use for action groups is to make it easier to see decisions inside your script. In one of my accounts, there are three specialties and it was hard to read how it was choosing the correct doctor by looking at the tree view. So I moved how it was reading them to Action Groups. This way, I can look at the decision tree (If branches) and see what was being chosen. Here is the Action Groups setup in the script:

Now when I want to use that information, I have it when I want to choose the on-call roles. Here is a snippet for a portion of the code:

You may ask why I am using these as Script instead of Screen; it is because in this particular instance on the weekends, we are holding certain calls so when the script resumes at 8am on Saturday and Sunday it rereads the on-call schedule for 8am and reverifies the on-call choices.

To set up an Action Group for the Script Shared area, the only way to get to this portion of the script is through the Tree View. To add an Action Group, click on the word "Shared," then right click on it, click on Insert and then select Action Group.

Then you will be presented with something like this:

You will now have to name your Action Group. Right click on the space and then click Properties.

Put the name in it — and if you want to document what the Action Group does, you can add a description. Note: you can have an Action Group in the Script Shared area with the same name as the Screen Shared area. The difference is the script will name it Script.YourActionGroupName and Screen.YourActionGroupName.

You can now add any actions you wish to use inside the group, anything but prompts on a screen.

You can look at Action Groups as procedures and pass data to them through variables. Mind you, these are not “local” — meaning when you change the variable, it changes it for the entire script; but if you have certain variables that are only used for a particular Action Group, you can use those.

Many times I have an action group that selects someone out of the IS On-call. I do this because there are multiple places in a script where you may have to touch the directory. Every time you want to move from one script to another, you have to refresh every element that touches the directory (Contact Dispatch, Contact Send Email, etc.) The less you have to refresh, the better. An example of this is:

When I select a contact, I am sending the Action Group a variable called RoleSelect, and then it reads in the Result in the Copy Fields portion of the Select Contact.

In this example, if it fails to find someone in the On-call Schedule it sets Result to whatever I have set in the ResultText field.

Now to look at the DoAction to use this Action Group. I set the RoleSelect to whatever information I want to use. Usually I have the roles/escalation table, if it is straightforward, in Client Shared Fields. And the ResultText is what the script sees if it fails to select a contact. Note: RoleSelect and ResultText must be “declared” in another part of the script, any other part of the script. That means it could be a screen field, or you can use a Set Field to create it. Usually I have an Action Group that is called InitializeScriptVariables that has the fields I need created there (if they aren’t created anywhere else).

One use for Action Groups is for those sites that use Lists in script for InfoPages. I have seen a few sites where the script has a list of doctors (maybe 20) and then based on what doctor the operator chooses, it has a List Branch to select the InfoPage for that particular doctor. Now one of these List Branches is okay — but if you have maybe 8 or 9 places in the script with the same List Branch and the same InfoPages, you will notice that your script takes forever to load in IS Supervisor, Run, Save, etc. That is because every InfoPage link that you put in the script IS Supervisor has to validate it. 20*8 links is 160 links it has to validate before it will let you proceed. Create a single Action Group and put your List Branch in there — and then use a DoActions (action group call) to the group and you have sped up your maintenance of the script quite a bit. In one instance, it took 2.5 minutes to save the script because of the multiple List Branches with all the InfoPages in the script; I replaced them all with 9 DoActions in the script and 1 Action Group. The script saved in about 10 seconds instead.

In closing, if you are moving blocks of scripts from one script to another, Action Groups makes it easy to create modules to move from script to script. Also, if you are doing the same set of actions in in multiple screens, it is easier to create an Action Group and the DoActions from multiple places in the script. I have a couple of Action Groups that I will show during the webinar on October 15 that I use in every single script of mine.

Laurie Blow

NAEO Annual Conference – Keynote to Be Jake Poore!

Submitted by Laurie Blow, Conference Chair

2015 NAEO Annual Conference

Rosen Shingle Creek | 9939 Universal Blvd. | Orlando, Florida 32819

NAEO is pleased to announce that Jake Poore from Integrated Loyalty Systems (http://www.jakepoore.com) will be the 2015 NAEO Annual Conference keynote speaker. Jake specializes in helping businesses and health-care institutions create and maintain world-class service organizations.

Jake’s presentation will bring in best practices from over 20 years’ experience training over 65,000 Disney employees to create memorable experiences for their guests, as well as more than a decade assisting healthcare organizations design and execute cultural blueprints to create ideal patient and employee experiences.

NAEO has provided Jake with a detailed description of our diverse membership and has requested he assist us developing programs that take into consideration that we are often the middlemen in the delivery of service. With Jake’s assistance, we can improve our ability to deliver an excellent service experience — even when we do not have control over the final resolution of a caller’s problem.

Don’t miss your opportunity improve your call center! Save the date for the NAEO 2015 conference—Pursuing Excellence Through Education and Collaboration. The conference will be held March 7-11, 2015, at the Rosen Shingle Creek in Orlando, FL.

Stay tuned and check back at naeo.org for more session information and conference details!

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Upcoming Webinars

Business Continuity Part 2
October 1, 2014 | 2:00 pm ET

Speaker: Kurt VanderScheer
Host: Evelyn Portinari

This webinar will be the second session offered that will cover the NAEO Disaster Recovery Plan that was written exclusively for our NAEO members. This program was developed over a two-year span in conjunction with Barney Pelant and Associates (a leader in Business Continuity and Disaster Recovery Planning).

We will discuss why your business (regardless of its size) will benefit from this program.

We will also discuss the program materials, as well as what outside resources will be made available to the membership to assist with completing this program. We will briefly discuss the various sections of the plan and start working through Chapter 1 of the program.

The goal of this webinar series is to work through the plan as a group so that everyone will benefit from each other’s experiences and knowledge.

IS Tips and Tricks
October 15, 2014 | 2:00 pm ET

Presenter: Michael Goumas
Host:
Tifani Leal

Learn the latest tips and trick to help save you time while programming IS. This webinar will be a great opportunity to learn new and efficient ways to program in IS.

Call Monitoring
October 29, 2014 | 2:00 pm ET

Presenter: Deborah Anders
Host: Carey Swift

Who? What? When? Where? Why? & How? Do you monitor your CSRs? Not sure how to get started or how to grade? This webinar will cover different aspects of call monitoring and coaching, including how to get set up and follow through on a program for your call center and how to encourage employee buy-in. Whether you participate in an AOE program or not, you are sure to benefit from this webinar.

Call Distribution
November 12, 2014 | 2:00 pm ET

Presenter: Theran Mossholder
Host: Evelyn Portinari

Learn all about call distribution. We will take a look at the difference between operator groups and station groups. We’ll also look at how to assign accounts and operators to the proper distributions groups. We will go over the process to develop a good call distribution plan, and how to implement that plan into action.

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Lisa Phillips

NAEO 2014 IS Summer Series Recap

by Theran J. Mossholder, Education Committee Chair; Lina Masri, Education Committee Co-Chair; Gerald Brosseau III, Certification Committee Chair

IS Summer Workshop Photo 2014

This year’s summer series was once again a huge success, with nearly 50 in attendance. This year’s workshop demonstrated the educational value and quality NAEO brings to its members. The 3-day intensive workshop was held August 3-5 in St. Louis, Missouri, at the Embassy Suites Airport Hotel. Attendees were offered a fantastic training environment, cooked-to-order breakfast, Free WiFi internet throughout the property, free airport shuttle service, and a daily complementary “Happy Hour.” In addition to the great amenities, there was a ton of time inside and outside the classroom to talk and share ideas among all attendees. As always, the wealth of knowledge passed among attendees was second to none.

The workshop was broken into two one-and-one-half-day sessions and came with a step-by-step workbook that every attendee received as part of the training. The first day of training focused on beginner skills, teaching the basics of IS. Topics included the creation of a new account, shared fields, information pages, call flow and flow charting. We then dove into the heart of the program and scripted a basic account from scratch. The first half of the second day took our basic script and added some more advanced actions including list branches, email and faxing, time of day “IF” statements, screen modes and much more. The second half of the seminar focused on contact based architecture. We started on day two with building a contact based directory from scratch. We then took our basic script and added features to turn the script into a contact based dispatching script.

IS Summer Workshop Photo 2014 2

This fantastic training opportunity would not be possible without the support of our Platinum Sponsor, Amtelco. The Education Committee would like to thank Amtelco for their support and for allowing two of their trainers, Susan Kirkpatrick and John VanWalsum, to assist with the seminar. The Education Committee would also like to thank Debbie Imes of Advantage Answering Plus, Michael Goumas of ProComm, and Theran Mossholder of Newtown & Flemington Answering Service for their time and expertise at this year’s seminar. Finally, we would like to thank all committee members; without their dedication and hard work, none of these educational opportunities would be possible.

The Education Committee and the Certification Committee are already planning next year’s summer workshop. Please do not hesitate to email your comments, feedback, and ideas to education@naeo.org. Both the Education Committee and Certification Committee invite you to “get involved” to share or suggest ideas for future workshops and webinars. Your feedback and survey results are the voice of the membership and result in the continued improvement of our educational programs.

We look forward to meeting new faces at the 2015 workshop!

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Mid-Year Financial Report (January 1-June 30, 2014)

By Gordon Mott, NAEO Treasurer

NAEO is in relatively good financial shape at the midpoint of 2014, especially considering the membership challenges we are facing now and will continue to face in the near future. Both a strong conference and conference IS workshop contributed to offset the losses in MAB (membership-administrative-board). As of June 30, we are ahead of budget by $15K with net income of $17.7K. Unfortunately, a good portion of this excess income will disappear as the year continues due to administrative and board expenses exceeding membership dues income.

As you may remember, the board adopted a “bucket” concept (conceptually, a type of cost accounting) in 2013 as a method to better manage NAEO’s finances and more clearly associate income and expenses in related areas. There are three buckets – conference, education/workshops and MAB. The intent is that each bucket should be self-sufficient, i.e. the revenues generated by its activities cover its expenses. My report (which follows) aligns with this concept.

The Dallas conference was highly successful and produced a net income of $17,000 based on gross revenue of $129,200 (registrations, sponsors and commission). This profit exceeded budget by over $10,000. The conference was efficiently managed and expenses tightly controlled, which contributed to its overall success.

The importance of educational activities to the membership continues to grow, as evidenced by the success of the workshops and webinars. The conference IS workshop generated revenue of $17,400 and produced a profit of nearly $10,000. Including the additional educational expenses for webinars and future program development, the education bucket produced net income of $8,600. As workshops have grown in importance, the efforts to maintain the quality and relevance have also grown. Several key members have contributed an immense amount of time. The expenses for their time and contributions have been absorbed in many cases by member companies. The board has recognized that in order to maintain this quality, we need to grow the number of instructors and begin to reimburse expenses. I do not foresee future workshops matching the profitability of past ones.

Membership dues during the initial six months totaled $74,300, significantly below budget. MAB expenses were $83,500 leading to a net loss of $7,900. The management of this bucket will be a challenge to NAEO’s board and our organization for the foreseeable future.

After ten years of no dues increase, NAEO instituted a 6% increase last year. I anticipate the need to continue increasing dues at a rate that exceeds inflation. The major reasons for the membership dues increase were to 1) begin reducing the MAB bucket deficit (with the goal of operating profitably) and 2) build NAEO’s capital account to support new programs and other opportunities presented. We have started that process. In addition to increasing revenues, the board is aggressively reviewing expenses and changing some past practices.

In summary, we are profitable — but keenly aware of some upcoming challenges. We are fortunate to have two strong programs (conference and education) that will help offset the MAB losses in the near term. Additionally, we are funding the capital programs reserve that will allow development of major initiatives and reduce their impact on operations. With the continuing income stream from dues and no major expenses for the balance of this year (plus very positive results from the St. Louis IS workshop), NAEO should finish 2014 with a reasonable profit and be well prepared for 2015.

If you have any questions or comments regarding the financial statements, please do not hesitate to contact me.

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david drenk

New Infinity Telephone Agent Version Number Display

by David Drenk

Description: Telephone Agent Login Screen_new vesion numbering

The Infinity Telephone Agent title bar has been changed to display both the Infinity server and the IS server software versions that are compatible with the Infinity Telephone Agent release. Previous releases did not indicate the IS version number. The new version number display is designed to make it easy to discern which server versions are compatible with each Infinity Telephone Agent release.

The Infinity Telephone Agent version number is displayed in the title bar of the Infinity Telephone Agent window and the Infinity Telephone Agent Login screen. The Telephone Agent version contains the Infinity server version number and the Telephone Agent revision number. This number is now followed by the IS server version number, displayed in parenthesis.

Description: New Telephone Agent Version Numbering

In the example shown here, the title bar displays “v5.60.06 (IS v4.0.4769),” which indicates this is the sixth version of Infinity Telephone Agent that is compatible with Infinity server version 5.60 and IS server version 4.0.4769.


Requirements:

  • Infinity Telephone Agent 5.60.05 (IS v4.0.4769) or later

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Kelli Harrigan

Internet Paging with SNPP and WCTP Contact Methods

by David Drenk

Two optional Contact Methods have been added to Infinity Intelligent Series (IS) to support Internet Paging.

  • The SNPP Contact Method is used to send pages using the Simple Network Paging Protocol (SNPP).
  • The WCTP Contact Method is used to send pages using the Wireless Communications Transfer Protocol (WCTP).

Description: System Setup Navigation Menu_PagingThe paging terminals are configured in the IS Supervisor System Setup pages. The TAP Setup pages have been moved to a Paging group on the System Setup Navigation Menu and Internet Paging settings have been added.

Click the Paging hyperlink on the System Setup Navigation Menu.

The Paging hyperlink expands the Navigation Menu to display hyperlinks for the Internet pages and the TAP Setup pages.

Click the Internet hyperlink.

The Internet hyperlink expands to show hyperlinks to the Servers page, the SNPP page, and the WCTP page.

  • The SNPP paging terminals are configured on the SNPP page.
  • The WCTP paging terminals are configured on the WCTP page.
  • Both paging components can be reset by clicking the hyperlinks on the Servers page.

To open a specific Paging page, click the corresponding hyperlink on the System Setup Navigation Menu.

SNPP

Description: SNPP

The SNPP page is used to configure IS Server connections to SNPP paging terminals.

To open the SNPP page, follow these steps:

  • On the System Setup Navigation Menu, click the Paging hyperlink.
  • Hyperlinks for the Internet and TAP Setup pages are displayed.
  • Click the Internet hyperlink.
  • Hyperlinks for the Servers, SNPP, and WCTP pages are displayed.
  • Click the SNPP hyperlink.
  • The SNPP page is displayed.

Adding an SNPP Paging Termin

To add a new SNPP Paging Terminal, click the Add icon. Description: green plus_black edge

The new terminal labeled “” appears in the SNPP menu and the properties of that terminal are displayed.

Name

Name is a descriptive name that will be used to refer to this terminal in the IS directories. Select a name that reflects the name of the paging provider so that it is easy to identify when setting up Contact Methods.

Type a name that describes the SNPP terminal.

Address

Address is the Internet Protocol (IP) address or Uniform Resource Locator (URL) of the SNPP provider. This address should be provided by your paging provider.

Type the IP address or URL of the SNPP provider.

Login

Login is the login name used to access your SNPP provider’s service.

Type the login name for the SNPP provider.

Password

Password is the password used to access your SNPP provider’s service.

Type the password for the SNPP provider.

Port

Port is the port number used to access your SNPP provider’s service. This number should be provided by your paging provider.

Type the port number provided by the SNPP provider.

Saving Your Entries

When you have finished entering SNPP terminal settings, click the Save icon Description: save to save the settings.

Deleting an SNPP Paging Terminal

To delete an SNPP paging terminal, select the name of the terminal in the SNPP menu and then click the Delete icon. Description: delete_no background

The Delete SNPP Confirmation dialog box is displayed.
Description: Delete SNPP Confirmation
To delete the terminal, click the Yes button.
or
To return to the SNPP page without deleting the device, click the No button.

WCTP

Description: WCTP

The WCTP page is used to configure IS Server connections to WCTP paging terminals.

To open the WCTP page, follow these steps:

  • On the System Setup Navigation Menu, click the Paging hyperlink.
  • Hyperlinks for the Internet and TAP Setup pages are displayed.
  • Click the Internet hyperlink.
  • Hyperlinks for the Servers, SNPP, and WCTP pages are displayed.
  • Click the WCTP hyperlink.
  • The WCTP page is displayed.

Adding a WCTP Paging Terminal

To add a new WCTP Paging Terminal, click the Add icon. Description: green plus_black edge

The new terminal labeled “” appears in the WCTP menu and the properties of that terminal are displayed.

Name

Name is a descriptive name that will be used to refer to this terminal in the IS directories. Select a name that reflects the name of the paging provider so that it is easy to identify when setting up Contact Methods.

Type a name that describes the WCTP terminal.

Address

Address is the Internet Protocol (IP) address or Uniform Resource Locator (URL) of the WCTP provider. This address should be provided by your paging provider.

Type the IP address or URL of the WCTP provider.

Sender ID

Sender ID is the sender identification provided by your WCTP provider to access the provider’s service.

Type the Sender ID provided by the WCTP provider.

Security Code

Security Code is the security code provided by your WCTP provider to access the provider’s service.

Type the security code provided by the WCTP provider.

Port

Port is the port number used to access your WCTP provider’s service. This number should be provided by your paging provider.

Type the port number provided by the WCTP provider.

Saving Your Entries

When you have finished entering WCTP terminal settings, click the Save icon Description: save to save the settings.

Deleting a WCTP Paging Terminal

To delete a WCTP paging terminal, select the name of the terminal in the WCTP menu and then click the Delete icon. Description: delete_no background

The Delete WCTP Confirmation dialog box is displayed.

Description: Delete WCTP Confirmation

To delete the terminal, click the Yes button.
or
To return to the WCTP page without deleting the device, click the No button.

Servers

Description: Servers

The Servers page is used to stop the SNPP and WCTP components of the IS Service, load the new settings, and restart the SNPP and WCTP components.

To open the Servers page, follow these steps:

  • On the System Setup Navigation Menu, click the Paging hyperlink.
  • Hyperlinks for the Internet and TAP Setup pages are displayed.
  • Click the Internet hyperlink.
  • Hyperlinks for the Servers, SNPP, and WCTP pages are displayed.
  • Click the Servers hyperlink.
  • The Servers page is displayed.

To reset the SNPP component of the IS Service, click the Reset SNPP Server hyperlink.

If the SNPP component was reset successfully, the message “SNPP Server was restarted” is displayed.
Description: SNPP server was restarted
To reset the WCTP component of the IS Service, click the Reset WCTP Server hyperlink.

If the WCTP component was reset successfully, the message “WCTP Server was restarted” is displayed.
Description: WCTP server was restarted

Description: Add Master FieldInternet Paging Contact Methods

Once paging terminals have been created, SNPP and WCTP Contact Methods can be added to the IS Directory.

  • The Contact SNPP ID data type is used to refer to the pager number of a Simple Network Paging Protocol (SNPP) Contact Method. SNPP Contact Methods are an optional addition to the Directory Contacts feature.
  • The Contact WCTP ID data type is used to refer to the pager number of a Wireless Communications Transfer Protocol (WCTP) Contact Method. WCTP Contact Methods are an optional addition to the Directory Contacts feature.

Paging Properties

When dispatching from a script using the Contact Dispatch response element, the settings on the Paging tab of the Contact Dispatch Properties apply to SNPP and TCP Contact Methods as well as to TAP Paging Contact Methods. A Subject property has been added for paging terminals that support a subject field for pages.
Description: Contact Dispatch_Paging

Text to Use for Pager Methods: The information in this property is sent to a pager when a TAP Pager, SNPP, or WCTP Contact Method is selected. By default this property is set to send the message summary.

To send information contained in a different message field, click the menu and select a different message script field. To change the type of information that can be sent, click the field type, select “Change To” from the menu, and select a field type from the submenu.

More information about Field Types is provided in the “Response Element Library” section of the Infinity Intelligent Series Supervisor Reference Guide.

Text to Append to Message Disposition: The information in this property will be appended to the message disposition displayed to the agent in the Dispatch window and the message history. Type the information that should be appended to the message disposition when a message is dispatched to a TAP Pager, SNPP, or WCTP Contact Method.

Subject (for terminals that support subject): The information in this property is sent as the subject of the message when sent through a paging terminal that supports a subject field. Type the information that should be sent in the Subject field.
By default, the field type of “Text to Append to Message Disposition” and “Subject” is Text. To change the type of information that can be stored, click the field type, select “Change To” from the menu, and select a field type from the submenu.

More information about Field Types is provided in the “Response Element Library” section of the Infinity Intelligent Series Supervisor Reference Guide.

Deliver message if successful: Will mark the message “Delivered” and cancel the dispatch job if the alphanumeric page is sent successfully.

Click the Apply button to save the Paging Properties.

Click the OK button to close the Contact Dispatch Properties window.

Requirements:

  • IS Supervisor 5.60.4364.06 or later
  • IS Server 3.7.4364.19150 or later
  • SQL Server 2005 or later
  • IS Messaging
  • IS Directory Contacts
  • SNPP Contact Method
  • WCTP Contact Method
  • Infinity 5.60.11 or later (optional)
  • Infinity Telephone Agent 5.60.4364.09 or later (optional)
  • Soft Agent 3.7.4364.06 or later (optional)
  • Web Scripting 3.7.4364.1 or later (optional)
  • IS Web 3.7.4364.0 or later (optional)
Amtelco Part Numbers: 232MP150 (SNPP) and 232MP151 (WCTP)

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